Every job has its risks. The secret to staying as safe as possible is knowing what they are and taking action to lower the them.

There are two types of jobs that increase your risk of DVT/PE, and some of them will surprise you. However, knowing can save your life.

Type I

Sitting for more than two hours at a time increases risk. So, if you work at any of the following jobs, it’s important to understand what you can do for prevention:

•  Truck drivers
•  Cab drivers
•  Airline pilots
•  Desk jockeys (anyone who sits at a desk)
•  Farmers, especially those working harvest
•  Police and EMT workers

Preventing DVT/PE in sitting professions

There are obviously times when you can’t leave your seat, but there are still things you can do.

  1. Stay hydrated. Your blood thickens when you’re dehydrated, and it is easier to form clots.
  2. Get up and walk around as frequently as you can. Having your muscles contract helps move blood through your veins.
  3. If you can safely do so at least once an hour, move your feet in a way that pumps your calf muscles.
  4. Consider getting a sequential compression device (SCD) like the Medshoola™ Compression Pump. It gives you all the localized benefits of walking without taking a step.

Type II

Because DVT/PE is often associated with being elderly or sick, people who are younger and fit falsely assume they don’t have to worry about it. However, since doctors often make the same assumption, it’s even more important that you understand your risk, the symptoms, and how to prevent DVT/PE.Job

Active professions with greater risk include:

•  Athletes, with endurance and contact sports having the highest risk
•  Construction workers, especially those who work in the heat
•  Nurses, doctors, and firefighters who work long shifts and don’t properly hydrate
•  Industrial workers who work in hot environments without adequate hydration

Preventing DVT/PE in active professions

  1. Stay hydrated. Your blood thickens when you’re dehydrated, and it is easier to form clots.
  2. If you travel following endurance activities or trauma, get up and walk at least once an hour or pump your calves. Because you are fit and likely have a lower heart rate, your blood is already being pumped through your veins more slowly, giving more time to clot.
  3. If you have to travel and can’t move around, consider getting a sequential compression device (SCD) like the Medshoola™ Compression Pump. It prevents your blood from pooling and clotting.

For more information about preventing DVT/PE and to receive a free “How to see if YOU are at Risk” article, Help Me Prevent DVT/PE